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Archive for April, 2013

Race Report: Gore-Tex Grand Traverse with Cancer Climber

“What’s it going to take to finish this thing and be happy when we’re done?” Sean asked in one of our many emails in the week before the start of the 16th annual Gore-Tex Grand Traverse.  I had attempted the race three times prior and had finished once, so I became our teams de-facto expert on preparation.

I answered, “Maintaining a reasonable pace, remembering WHY we’re doing it, hitting the checkpoints before cutoffs, drinking beer when we’re done.”

Easy, right?

Grand Traverse race preparation is a marathon.  Honestly, it’s more stressful on the days leading up to the race start than doing the race itself.  Gear, gear, gear.  Spend all day at racer meetings and gear check.  Try to nap.  Eat and drink as much as you can, something that helps to prevent proper napping.  Panic because you don’t have the right flavor 5-Hour Energy.  Realize flavor doesn’t matter at 6am.  Check, double-check, triple-check and quadruple-check your skin set up.  Pack.  Repack.  Re-repack.  Nap.  Ugh.

After a day that passes in segments, it was time to head up to the start line.  The start of the race is unlike any other event I’ve been a part of.  Mostly because it takes place at the same time as the local radio station’s huge fundraiser, Soul Train.  Imagine, hundreds of ski randonee racers lining up at the Crested Butte base area, preparing to ski 40 miles into the night, whilst hundreds of local crazies are halfway through their night of reliving the 70’s disco era.  Afro wigs and headlights, bell-bottoms and speed suits, platform shoes and ski boots intermingled while Kool and the Gang echoed against the mountains.  Quite the sight.

Sean and I made our way to the back of the pack aiming for a casual start.  Our goal was to ski within ourselves and not get sucked into the racer mentality, risking too strong of a start and blowing ourselves out before the real challenge began.  This strategy proved costly an hour into the race, where we had to battle recurring bottle necks through breakable crust over steep gullys and open meadows.  Patients was key, as getting frustrated during this section of the race would only cause tension among teammates.  We went with the flow and finally arrived on Brush Creek Road where the snow had been solidified and made travel much easier.

When we arrived on East Brush Creek, we decided it was a great opportunity to make up some time.  I hadn’t expected the previous section to take so long, so we settled into a brisk pace and moved swiftly up to Friends Hut.  Aside from a minor slip into an open creek (brrr!) the climb went well and we found ourselves at Friends an hour before the cut off time.  We took the opportunity to replenish our water, to eat some food and to bundle up in defense against the wind that could be heard howling a thousand feet above.  The climb up Star Pass promised to be steep and cold.

This is when I learned how hot Sean’s engine runs.  From the start, he was wearing shorts and a t-shirt.  He threw on a hoodie/windbreaker for a little while but complained of sweating and being too hot.  Remember, we started at midnight.  At over 9,000 feet and rising.  At temperatures below freezing.  He claims to have the metabolism of a 14 year old and this is good evidence.  He used wind-pants and a windbreaker to head up Star Pass and later said he could have done without them.  Wow.

We got to the top of Star and prepared to descend.   I talked to a course marshal who told me we looked good for finishing.  It was 7:20 am and we were about a third of the way into the race.

The drop down from Star Pass was a blast.  The snow was choppy powder rather than the breakable crust we encountered earlier in the race.  It skied really well, much better than the section did last year.  We got down to the transition zone and joined about 10 other teams who had descended before us.  There was a feeling of jubilation among the racers, because there were only two timed check points left, and those were well in the distance.  With them so far away, it felt like we’d all surely make it to Aspen.

At this point, however, Sean began to cough.  He had been suffering from a chest cold since earlier in the week.  Keep in mind, this guy has one functioning lung.  I knew his cold was going to be an issue, but it hadn’t seemed to bother him earlier on in the race.  Maybe it was the cold air on the descent, but Sean was hacking severely from this point on.  He had difficulty drawing a full breath and was constantly on the verge of vomiting   I tried my best to maintain a pace that would bring us to the next check point in time without putting too much exertion on his suffering lung.  We ended up pacing a couple of teams that were moving at a similar rate, which helped.  I know how difficult it was for Sean to keep moving with his condition and he did a great job fighting through it.

The route took us through Taylor Flats and up Taylor Pass where the wind was fierce.  We chose to keep our skins on for the brief descent which allowed us to climb up the subsequent Gold Hill without transitioning.  Taylor and Gold are pretty short, but the steepness makes them true stingers.  We put them behind us as quickly as possible.

At the top of Gold Hill, we ripped our skins for the third time and made the descent to the Barnard Hut.  It was about 12:30 and at that pace, we were sure to make it to Aspen before the 4pm cut off at the Sundeck.

As we entered the checkpoint, a volunteer casually asked us how we were doing.  “Fine except I can’t breathe,” replied Sean.  The volunteer turned out to be a doctor and asked Sean if we could examine him a bit further.  The doc was pretty blown away by our team, both of us being two-time cancer survivors, and offered Sean a treatment for asthma.  I sat drinking soup and eating while the doc checked Sean out, wondering if we’d be allowed to continue.

Twenty minutes passed.  I prepared our gear, refilled water and ate.  I went to the medical tent to find Sean seated and inhaling from a tube that was releasing some sort of white vapor.  It was making him feel better momentarily, but wasn’t curing the congestion and constriction in his chest.  The realization started to sink in: the chest cold was winning and it didn’t look like our team was going to continue.

Huge bummer.

The doctor said, “Sean, I think we’re going to have to take you out on a snowmobile.”  To this, Sean replied, “That doesn’t mean HE has to go out on a sled, does it?”  Generally, teams aren’t allowed to continue without both members.  The nature of back country travel is too dangerous for individuals to head out alone and the race organizers have stated that only teams of two are allowed to continue.  Luckily, Sean’s very charismatic.  He explained our mission, to compete to raise funds for Cancer Climber.  He added that this was my fourth GT and that I was very knowledgeable about the course.  The section remaining was very benign as far as back country travel goes, as it follows a jeep road all the way to the sundeck.

The decision was made to let me continue on.  Not giving the officials a chance to rethink their decision (not that they would have, the route had no major challenges or potential avalanche danger remaining), I thanked Sean for his super-human effort, stepped into my bindings and began the final leg of the journey.

I felt GREAT.  The pace we had been setting through the night was a finishers pace, certainly not a high-placer’s pace.  We were strolling, largely because of ‘ole one-lung’s handicapping cold.  When I got the go-ahead from race officials, I took off like it was a 100 meter dash.  And continued at that pace.  Up and over each minor climb on Richmond Ridge, plowing over the whooped out snowmobile troughs that have been known to make grown men cry and carrying past the heartbreaking flats between.  I got in the zone and got to the sundeck in amazing time.

At the sundeck I ran into three other teams, in various stages of celebration and exhaustion.  We knew we had made it, and everyone shared that stupid, aww-shucks grin of a school boy that got away with a solid prank, or maybe just stole a kiss from that girl he likes.  Joy abounded.  Jokes were made during the slow, much less urgent transition from up to down, and I eventually stepped down into my bindings and pulled on my goggles for the final decent.  The decent into Aspen.  A place where the beer flows like wine (unless they run out!  Yeah, I arrived so late that the kegs had been kicked.  WHAT?!?  Luckily Joan was on hand to grab a PBR for me before I turned around and stormed back to Crested Butte), where beautiful women instinctively flock like the salmon of Capistrano.  ASSSSSSPEN!

The descent was glorious.  I reveled in the corn.  I hooted and hollered as a overtook fellow racers, offering what encouragement I could in an effort to make their burning legs hurt a little bit less.  I was there.  I was going to make it!  For me.  For Sean.  For Cancer Climber.  For all the patients, young and old, going through treatment.  Cancer Climber for the win!

My face was still plastered with that silly grin as I crossed the finish line.  The journey was complete.  Sean was there, arriving earlier via snowmobile, already in his signature flip-flops, to give me a big congratulatory hug.  “Next time I won’t be sick,” he said.  “Doesn’t matter,” I said, “We gave that thing hell for as long as you could.  I’m amazed you made it as far as you did in your condition.  Great effort, dude.”

Cancer Climber will be back to the Grand Traverse.  We’re used to adversity, we can handle challenges.  We met our goals we set from the start:  Maintain a reasonable pace: check.  Even if it was slower than we could have gone because of illness, we made progress and would have finished in time.  Remember WHY we’re doing it: check.  Especially through the dark, beautiful night, I took the time to think about loved ones who have battled cancer.  Some have won, some have lost.  Remembering those battles fueled my strides and with each step along the way, cancer patients were with me.  Hit checkpoints before cutoffs: check.  Maybe we didn’t proceed as a team past Barnard, but technically, we reached every checkpoint before the cutoff time.  I guess the sundeck has a cutoff too, but come on.  We did damn good.  Drink beer when we’re done: check.  PBR never tasted soooo good.  Next year we’ll be more prepared and healthier.  Look out, GT’14.

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Hotel Fitness!! (Sarcastic) Yay!!!

I’m not nearly as excited as that title might suggest!!!!!

The hotel I choose to stay in during my business travel is the best.  It’s got an ideal location to major freeways.  It’s in very close proximity to several restaurants  providing many options for both chain and local flavor.  It’s near the airport and has a complimentary breakfast.  It even has underground, heated parking for free.

But the fitness center sucks.

Apparently I don’t care enough to stay at a different hotel, but I do care enough to complain about it.

This inconvience has forced me to become very creative with my workouts while traveling.  (And a quick note on this: If I can’t fit a work out into my business travel, I go nuts.  Traveling inspires the most healthy people to eat like crap.  I spend most of my business travel days driving around and sitting in coffee shops, milking free internet.  Also, working.  But for me to remain sane, I have to fit in a workout as often as I can.)

I now know how many stairs lie between the Springhill Suites Chicago O’Hare basement and 10th floor.  A fitting number, 187.  (Fitting because, legend has it, 187 is the cop code for murder.  Yeah, I’d classify 10 floor stair-repeats as murder.)

I do step-ups on the treadmill and ski jumps over towels.  The ceiling is too low and when I do burpies I practically punch through the tiles above me.  On the weekends, I walk aimlessly through the city, hoofing it waayyyyy further than a typical commuter might in an effort to counteract the hours of sitting behind the wheel and eating unhealthy food.

I’m glad this will be my last travel season 🙂